250-920-6192 PO Box 101 Union Bay British Columbia V0R 3B0
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Antique Regency Rosewood Canterbury

$ 3,695.00 $ 2,895.00

Antique Regency Rosewood Canterbury Music Cabinet

Measures approximately 24 inches wide, 19 1/2 inches tall and 16 inches front to back

Cushion shaped “secret” drawer. Shaped legs. Original brass castors.

This is a wonderful period example of a Premium Rosewood Regency style music cabinet and is in exceptional condition bearing very few signs of use or wear……..  See below for more details……

 

Description

Antique Regency Rosewood Canterbury 

Superb example of an early Rosewood  William IV (Regency) Canterbury

This is a wonderful period example of a Premium Rosewood Regency style music cabinet and is in exceptional condition bearing very few signs of use or wear. Full width cushion shaped ‘phantom’ or ‘secret’ drawer constructed with fine feather dovetail joints and White-Oak liner. All four supports are turned and shaped and rest upon original brass and iron castors.

Dating to the early/mid nineteenth century, this wonderful Canterbury has four dividers of a stylized bat-wing form with scalloped edged centres.  The turned and shaped rails secure each divider and there are triple turned roundels to each face. Each compartment is easily large enough for periodicals & broadsheet newspapers and music manuscripts.

Point of interestThe Canterbury: Developed in England in the 1780s the first Canterbury was said to have been commissioned by the then Archbishop of Canterbury, John Bird Sumner, (1780 – 1862). The Canterbury was originally designed as a practical way of storing ‘sheet music’ and became the ‘must have’ item of furniture sought out by ‘high-society’ and the Elite during the Regency and Georgian eras. Although designs were many and varied the basic concept remained the same for many years. During the later Victorian period cabinet makers began to make a smaller version of the Canterbury in a more simplified box-like form with less exotic woods such as mahogany and oak. With the advent of simplified designs and the use of less expensive materials the smaller Canterbury became popular with the more ambitious members of the middling classes who sought to emulate those who were more wealthy. By the end of the Victorian era the Canterbury had evolved from being a sheet-music cabinet to become more specifically for the storage of newspapers and magazines.

Additional information

Weight 6 kg
Dimensions 76 x 60 x 50 cm